Airway Abbreviations

Herewith a collaborative effort from the airway Twitterati to establish a list of common airway abbreviations:

  • AFOI  –  Awake fibre-optic (or flexible optic) intubation
  • ApOX  –  Apnoeic Oxygenation
  • BB  –  Bronchial blocker
  • BVM  –  Bag/Valve/Mask device (see BVMR)
  • BVMR  –  Bag/Valve/Mask/Reservoir device (see BVM)
  • CICO  –  Can’t intubate, can’t oxygenate  (see CICV)
  • CICV  –  Can’t intubate, can’t ventilation (CICO now in use)
  • CL  –  Cormack-Lehane grade
  • DL  –  Direct laryngoscopy
  • DLT  –  Double-lumen endobronchial tube
  • DSI  –  Delayed sequence induction
  • ESA  –  Emegency Surgical Airway (see FONA)
  • ETI  –  Endotracheal intubation
  • ETT  –  Endotracheal tube
  • EtCO2  –  End-tital carbon dioxide
  • EXIT  –  EX-utero Intrapartum Treatment
  • FB  –  Foreign body
  • FETO  –  Fetal Endoscopic Tracheal Occlusion (or Fetoscopic EndoTracheal Occlusion)
  • FiO2  –  Fraction of inspired oxygen
  • FOI  –  Fibre-optic intubation
  • FONA  –  Front-of-neck access (see ESA)
  • LA  –  Local anaesthetic
  • LMA  –  Laryngeal Mask Airway (trade name, see SGA etc)
  • MAD  –  Mucosal Atomisation Device
  • MP  –  Mallampati grade
  • NPA  –  Nasopharyngeal airway
  • NODESAT – Nasal Oxygenation During Efforts at Secuing A Tube
  • OPA  –  Oropharyngeal airway
  • PLA  –  Perilayngeal airway
  • RSI  –  Rapid sequence induction
  • SAD  –  Supraglottic airway device (see SGA, EGA, XGA)
  • SGA  –  Supraglottic airway (see SAD, EGA, XGA)
  • THRIVE  –  Transnasal, Humidified, Rapid-Insufflatory Ventilatory Exchange
  • VL  –  Video layngoscopy
  • XGA  –  Extraglottic airway (see EGA, SAD, SGA)

Contributions/comments?  DM @openaiwayorg or @rosshofmeyr

Thanks to @AirwayMxAcademy for initiating the idea!

VLVids: Intubation in Spinal Immobilisation

Clinical video demonstrating a collection of techniques to facilitate elective intubation for a patient with an unstable cervical spinal injury in caliper traction.  Note the sideways introduction of the VL blade due to limited space for the VL handle, optimisation of the view (‘Rule of 3’), use of a coude-tipped bougie (introducer), and the 3-part technique to advance the endotracheal tube when it catches on the arytenoid cartilage (pull tube back to disengage, rotate 90 degrees counterclockwise, advance tube).

Collaborative ENT/Anaesthesia ‘Shared Airway’ Workshop

We’re hosting this in Cape Town in April.  It’s going to be the first workshop if it’s kind on the continent, and perhaps even in the world:  a combined cadaver and manikin simulation workshop, featuring senior anaesthesia and ENT trainees and specialists working together to solve challenging airway problems in real time.  This will be reinforced by expert didactic input from local leaders in the field.  Places are very limited, but expect feedback and images/video here on OpenAirway.

CTEAAC_Invitation

NAPEM17: Paediatric Procedual Sedation in the ED

Herewith my final presentation from NAPEM 2017 in Hyderabad, India. Not really an airway talk, but in the spirit of #FOAM, I’m reproducing it here.

The SASA Paediatric Procedural Sedation and Analgesia (PSA) Guidelines (2016 Update) are available from the ‘Publications’ section of the SASA web page (and are open access), but for ease of access, I have made the file available here as well:

SASA Paediatric Sedation Guidelines (2016 update)

NAPEM’17: Securing the Paediatric Airway – What’s New?

As promised, my presentation from the 9th National Assembly on Paediatric Emergency Medicine currently being held at the Apollo Institute of Medical Sciences & Research in Hyderabad, India.  There is much more content in the audio, which I will try to add to the post later when it is available.Thoughts? Comments?  Post them below!

NAPEM’17: Paediatric Difficult Airway in the ED

As promised/per usual, here’s my presentation from the current National Assembly on Paediatric Emergency Medicine, being held now (16-19 Feb 2017) at the Apollo Institute of Medical Sciences & Research, Hyderabad, India.  Much of the content is in the audio, of course…which I will post if/when available.
Comments welcome below as usual!

Understanding airway geometry: Brainchildren of Dr Kenneth Greenland

One of the greatest influences on my understanding of the geometry of the airways, and thereby the technical skills and processes required to place airway devices of all types, has been the work on publications of Dr Kenneth Greenland. Greenland’s publication in the BJA in 2010 should be required reading for anybody who performs intubation. However, if you want to really understand theories of the airway curves and columns, I highly recommend getting it from the horses mouth.  Here below are several videos in which can Greenland explains his thinking and theories.  While they are a little longer than your average #FOAM material, I cannot recommend them strongly enough.

Bristol Advanced Simulation Instructor Masterclass (BASIM) in Cape Town

Although not an airway course, we have been greatly influenced by the methods used in BASIM for creating and undertaking airway simulations.  Highly recommended course presented by the master Dr David Grant himself.

More information about the course can be found on the BMSC site here.  To register for the workshops in Cape Town in March 2017, click this link.

 

Algorithms page updated

It’s always a challenge to stay up to date in the field of airway management, but we do try.  The recently published All Indian Difficult Airway Association Guidelines (just released in the December 2016 edition of IJA) have been added to our Algorithms page, as well as an update of the Vortex 2 video and revised links to the Resuscitation Council of South Africa algorithms.  If you spot missing algorithms or broken links, please comment!

Open access meducation for all aspects of airway management