Videos

AirwayHowTo: Clean a CMAC VL

If you work in an environment without constant access to staff to clean and process your video laryngoscopes, you need to know how to do it yourself. This quick video demonstrates pragmatic cleaning of the C-MAC VL (original and latest version) for low-risk patients. Where there is high infection risk, heavy soiling or blood on the blades, high level disinfection may be indicated.

VLVids: Intubation in Spinal Immobilisation

Clinical video demonstrating a collection of techniques to facilitate elective intubation for a patient with an unstable cervical spinal injury in caliper traction.  Note the sideways introduction of the VL blade due to limited space for the VL handle, optimisation of the view (‘Rule of 3’), use of a coude-tipped bougie (introducer), and the 3-part technique to advance the endotracheal tube when it catches on the arytenoid cartilage (pull tube back to disengage, rotate 90 degrees counterclockwise, advance tube).

VLVids: Room for Improvement!

This real-life videolaryngoscopy example (RSI of a patient with a head injury for craniectomy) shows some commom errors, and room for improvement. Three major areas that could be better to spot here:

  1. Less-than-ideal positioning of the VL blade. The tip is too deep (over the epiglottis, rather than in the vallecula), which reduces the available space to manipulate both VL and ETT, the field of vision, and the ability to perceive the approach of the ETT.
  2. Quick suctioning of the secretions/saliva/mucus would reduce the risk of losing the view or the patient aspirating.
  3. An introducer (stylet/bougie) would greatly assist passage of the ETT through the cords.

VLVids: Use an introducer!

A classic example of good videolaryngoscopy technique being thwarted by not always using an introducer (stylet or bougie).  Note the clinician performing the intubation gets perfect, optimised VL view (Rule of 3), but then struggles to pass the ETT anteriorly enough, losing time.  Although this was no problem for the well-oxygenated patient in this case (and the intubation is still under 45 seconds duration), in a critical case it can lead to desaturation, frustration, and possible intubation trauma.

Confined Space Airway Management

Ross’s talk from the 2015 SMACCdub meeting, with credit to #SMACC and the Intensive Care Network.

This and many other talks available on the SMACC home pages.

Click here for the slides, podcast and original abstract on ICN.

How to build a breathing, bleeding cricothyroidotomy simulator

Jean-Christopher Ozenne (@JCOzenne) of Gouvieux, France has generously published this great video on how to build “The Mustache” – a breathing, bleeding cricothyroidotomy simulator – using cheap and ubiquitous equipment.  Can’t wait to try this one out…I particularly like the artistic touch.  To paraphrase V himself:  A cric trainer without bleeding is not a cric trainer worth having.

Bronchial blockers: EZ-Blocker

Herewith a quick tutorial on the use and placement of the bifurcated, dual-balloon ‘EZ-Blocker’ bronchial blocker.  More videos on the DLT vs BB debate, the other blockers, and troubleshooting advice to follow.  Comments welcomed as always!

#FOAM? SMACC? What?

If you’ve found OpenAirway by search or accident, and the concept of #FOAM (Free, Open-Access Meducation) is new to you, then you’ll find the following video enlightening.  The SMACC (Social Media And Critical Care) meeting is the yearly gathering of #FOAM enthusiasts, although it’s spiritual home, arguably, is within the ether of the Internet.  OpenAirway was proud to be represented at SMACC this year in Dublin – truly an opportunity to interact, connect and be inspired by the best minds in acute and critical care from all disciplines.

Basic fibreoptic/flexible scope skills video

Another quick training video, on the basic techniques of driving a flexible scope (fibreoptic or video) for intubation.  This was made specifically as a primer for people in our own department taking part in a training study, but hopefully it is useful to a larger audience!

Please put your comments and (hopefully constructive) critique below.   As always, you’re welcome to use with attribution!

The permanent page for this video can be found here.