Tag Archives: intubation

Nairobi Airway Course 2017: Photos

Some photos of the action at the Nairobi Surgical Skills Centre this week. Many thanks to the local faculty from the University of Nairobi and other institutions, the companies that supported use of the facilities and equipment, and the enthusiastic delegates!



Resources and notes from the course are available on the course page here

VLVids: Intubation in Spinal Immobilisation

Clinical video demonstrating a collection of techniques to facilitate elective intubation for a patient with an unstable cervical spinal injury in caliper traction.  Note the sideways introduction of the VL blade due to limited space for the VL handle, optimisation of the view (‘Rule of 3’), use of a coude-tipped bougie (introducer), and the 3-part technique to advance the endotracheal tube when it catches on the arytenoid cartilage (pull tube back to disengage, rotate 90 degrees counterclockwise, advance tube).

Basic fibreoptic/flexible scope skills video

Another quick training video, on the basic techniques of driving a flexible scope (fibreoptic or video) for intubation.  This was made specifically as a primer for people in our own department taking part in a training study, but hopefully it is useful to a larger audience!

Please put your comments and (hopefully constructive) critique below.   As always, you’re welcome to use with attribution!

The permanent page for this video can be found here.

Video: Flexible endoscopic intubation through SGAs

A description of the technique for intubating through a supraglottic airway that offers a sufficiently large internal bore to allow an appropriate-sized endotracheal tube using an adult fibreoptic or flexible video endoscope.  Take note of the method of providing ventilation during the endoscopy!

As usual, this is an unscripted video, and constructive critique is welcomed to help us improve the educational offering.

Video: Overview of intubating through SGAs

Yip, another whirlwid tour, this time of the situations and considerations that may lead to intubating through a supraglottic airway.  Each method will be expanded upon in later videos.

These videos are made off-the-cuff and can certainly be improved, so if you have suggestions, please put them in the comments!

Four methods of endotracheal tube passage in simulated airways – Poster from ICEM 2016

Here’s the poster by Kingma, Hofmeyr, Zeng, Cooramasamy and Brainard that has generated a fair amount of interest (>10k impressions on Twitter).  Full analysis hopefully coming soon to a journal near you.  Bottom line?  In a difficult airway, you’d best be using a bougie or stylet, no matter who you are.  As far as bougies go, preloading rather than railroading is faster and seems better.  Click on the image for a full-resolution PDF (2Mb).

Four_Methods_ETI_Poster_ICEM_2016

Want to talk about this?  Comment below or ping @surferkirst @rosshofmeyr @TheSharpEndCrew on Twitter!

Straightforward AirTraq Intubation

A video example of performing a straightforward intubation using the AirTraq optical laryngoscope, here coupled with the WiFi-enabled camera unit to allow image capture.  Note the optimal positioning (“Rule of 3”):

  1. Epiglottis visible at the top of the screen
  2. Vocal cords central in the vertical axis
  3. Interarytenoid cleft in the lower half of the screen.

This intubation is using a reinforced (“armored”) endotracheal tube, which is sometimes more difficult than a standard ETT, as it is a little floppier.  The AirTraq makes it simple in this instance.  The reinforced ETT was used to facilitate patient positioning for a neurosurgical case.

Is fibreoptic intubation a dying art?

Over the past two weeks, I have been involved in three cases where all means of laryngoscopic intubation failed – including multiple different blades, introducers and highly skilled hands – and the airway could only be intubated with a flexible fibreoptic ‘scope.  These three cases illustrate the type of pathology that can make even video laryngoscopy (VL) difficult or impossible:

  • A morbidly obese patient in traction with a high spinal injury
  • A patient presenting with late-stage, advanced laryngeal carcinoma with both supra- and infraglottic involvement and masses
  • A child with Pierre-Robin Sequence presenting for mandibular distraction surgery.

In an article on the Airway E-Learning site, Dr Matthew Wiles details why he thinks fibreoptic intubation (FOI) is becoming a rare beast, and why we should work hard to maintain excellence in this important skill.

Despite being a huge fan and daily user of VLs, I am completely in agreement with his sentiments.